Wholistic Spirituality

For eons the traditional church has been anchored in cognition. It has emphasized doctrine, beliefs - the mind. And the history of Christianity is a history of disagreement over these kinds of issues. All that is well and good.


But there is more to living by the Spirit of Christ than doctrine and the world of thoughts.


If I do not do the good I want to do – a writing from Paul and I suggest astute psychology for all of us, what do I do? The kneejerk reaction is try harder. The traditional church response is – pray, read the bible, worship, find a supportive friend, etc.


How about – eat well. Very few say that. But eating well (nutritionally) regulates the blood sugar in our system and that affects the sugar level that feeds our brains. And if the brain is fed we might just have the mental process to be more patient or more understanding.


How about sleep. If we are rested – the same thing applies.


How about exercise – there is no end of the studies which show how exercise benefits our mental and spiritual condition. One study noted that if exercise could be put in the pill it would be the most powerful drug on the market.


When we are at peace (exercise, rest, nutrition) we are more apt to be kind people. If we are anxious or angry – such states are not the fruitful ground out of which kindness grows.


Want to do more good? Maybe the spiritual response is not so much think about it and beat yourself up with the wet noodle of cognition and thought (and guilt). Maybe the most helpful and beneficial response is – get more rest, eat healthy, exercise.


That a wholistic approach to spirituality.



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